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How much? The invaluable response…

The last few days have been jolly interesting in more ways than one and I just felt the need to scribble a few words… writing a blog needs inspiration, writing a tender needs inspiration, a structured approach and perspiration. 😊

I can write a blog when the mood takes me but, unlike my able colleagues here, I’m not sure my brain could handle writing a tender. I have seen the blood, sweat and tears that go into making a tender document: you have to hit the right notes that will resonate with a buyer looking for an enjoyable (yes, really!) read that ticks all the right boxes so that they can put your bid straight through to the final round. The ‘also rans’ will fall at the first hurdle because they haven’t paid attention.

Get that apostrophe wrong on the cover page and that week or month’s toil will be heading straight for the bin… it happens. Round 1 is to get rid of as many of the tenders as possible to create a short list of 3 or 4 serious contenders.

This week a new client asked us to complete the fourth tender in as many weeks for a global name that had very few clues as to what they were looking for and even fewer days in which to spin it around.

You can’t hand this to a fresh-faced new tender writer as they simply would be overwhelmed with the proposition… you need to bring in those with vast experience, who just happened to have a space in their diary made free by a client whose tender deadline was pushed back… thank goodness!

Tender writers typically like a structure. It’s what they are used to dealing with on public sector tenders: not so in this case…there’s no structure, no clues and the client isn’t sure what he wants. Watching the experts go from ‘what on earth are we going to do here?’ to ‘Right, this is what we need and here’s how we tackle it’ is like poetry in motion – the bull taken by the horns, a structure laid out and suitable wording flows, wording that will convey key differentiators (USPs) and wow the evaluators.

Our tender writers know they have the support of a great team when they need help: this allows them to relax, focus on the job in hand and do what they are extremely good at.

This level of experience and professionalism doesn’t come cheap… why should it? The potential win is massive and so if the client quibbles about the price rather than looking at the contract value maybe we should walk away and leave them to their own devices… an invaluable experience!

Thank you.

Jon

Photo by jesse orrico on Unsplash

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